How

How to Get a Bird Out of Your House: A Step-by-Step Guide

If you’ve ever had a bird fly into your house, you know it can be a stressful experience. The bird is likely scared and confused, and you’re probably wondering how to get it out safely and humanely. That’s where Bubird comes in. We’re here to provide you with a step-by-step guide on how to get a bird out of your house, as well as tips on how to prevent birds from entering your home in the future. So, take a deep breath, and let’s get started.

How to Get a Bird Out of Your House: A Step-by-Step Guide
How to Get a Bird Out of Your House: A Step-by-Step Guide

I. Assess the Situation and Take Precautions

Assess the Situation and Take Precautions
Assess the Situation and Take Precautions

Once you’ve identified the type of bird and assessed the situation, it’s time to take precautions to ensure the safety of both the bird and yourself.

First, try to create a calm environment by turning off any loud noises or music. Cover any reflective surfaces, such as mirrors or windows, with sheets or towels. This will help to prevent the bird from becoming disoriented and further agitated.

If the bird is small and seems relatively calm, you may be able to gently guide it towards an open window or door. Use slow, smooth movements and avoid making sudden noises.

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If the bird is larger or appears aggressive, it’s best to call animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator for assistance. In the meantime, keep the bird confined to a small room or area away from people and pets.

If the bird has flown into your home from a screen door, there are a few things you need to take into account before trying to get it out:

Factor Consideration
Type of bird Larger birds need a wider area to fly, while smaller birds can escape through smaller spaces.
Behavior of the bird If the bird is frightened, it is more likely to try to escape and may injure itself.
Presence of other pets or children Make sure they are in a safe place away from the bird.

Once you have assessed the situation, you can take the following steps to get the bird out of your home:

  • Open all the windows and doors in the room where the bird is located.
  • Gently herd the bird towards the open window or door with a broom or stick.
  • If the bird is reluctant to leave, you can try placing a piece of food or water near the open window or door to entice it out.
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II. Make the Room Uninviting

Make the Room Uninviting
Make the Room Uninviting

Making the room uninviting to the bird will encourage it to leave on its own. Here are a few things you can do to make the room less appealing:

  • Close the curtains or blinds.
  • Turn off the lights.
  • Remove any food or water sources.

If the bird is still in the room, you can try making some noise to scare it away. Clap your hands, stomp your feet, or shout. You can also try using a broom or other long object to gently shoo the bird out of the room.

Remember: Never attempt to catch the bird with your bare hands. Birds can carry diseases and parasites, and their wings can flap powerfully, causing injury.

Seal Up Entry Points

Once the bird is out of the room, seal up any holes or cracks that it could have used to enter. This will help prevent other birds from getting inside. You can use caulk, weatherstripping, or even duct tape to seal up the openings.

If you have a bird feeder outside your home, make sure that it is hung at least 5 feet off the ground and away from any windows or doors.

Related Post: How to Keep Birds from Flying into Windows

Bird Proof Your Windows

If you have large windows, consider installing bird screens. These screens will allow light and air to enter the room while preventing birds from getting in. You can also apply a film to your windows that will make them more difficult for birds to see.

Related Post: How to Keep Birds from Flying into Windows

III. Encourage the Bird to Exit

Encourage the Bird to Exit
Encourage the Bird to Exit

Once you’ve taken steps to secure the bird and prevent it from causing damage, you can try to encourage it to exit on its own. Here are some tips:

  • Open windows and doors: If possible, open windows and doors in the room where the bird is located. This will create a path for the bird to escape and may encourage it to fly out on its own.
  • Dim the lights: Birds are attracted to light, so dimming the lights in the room may help to calm the bird and make it more likely to leave.
  • Play calming music: Playing soft, calming music may help to relax the bird and make it more likely to fly out on its own.
  • Place a perch near the exit: If you have a bird feeder or perch, place it near the exit so that the bird has a place to land once it leaves the room.
  • Avoid chasing the bird: Chasing the bird will only make it more stressed and less likely to leave. Instead, stay calm and patient and give the bird time to exit on its own.
Things NOT to Do
Don’t Use Aerosol Sprays: Aerosol sprays can be harmful to birds and can also make them more stressed, making them less likely to leave.
Don’t Throw Objects at the Bird: Throwing objects at the bird will only scare it and make it more difficult to get rid of.
Don’t Try to Catch the Bird with Your Hands: Trying to catch the bird with your hands can be dangerous, both for you and the bird. If you must catch the bird, use a net or a towel.

If you’ve tried all of these methods and the bird still hasn’t left, you may need to call animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator for assistance.

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V. Seek Professional Assistance If Necessary

Seek Professional Assistance If Necessary
Seek Professional Assistance If Necessary

If you are unable to safely remove the bird yourself, or if the bird is injured, you should seek professional assistance. There are many organizations that specialize in bird rescue and rehabilitation. These organizations have the experience and ise to safely remove the bird from your home and provide it with the care it needs.

Here are some of the organizations that you can contact for assistance:

  • The Humane Society of the United States: 1-866-720-2676
  • The National Audubon Society: 1-888-283-8246
  • The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA): 1-888-426-4435

When you call one of these organizations, they will be able to provide you with instructions on how to safely remove the bird from your home. They may also be able to send a wildlife rehabilitator to your home to help you.

Organization Contact Website
The Humane Society of the United States 1-866-720-2676 https://www.humanesociety.org/
The National Audubon Society 1-888-283-8246 https://www.audubon.org/
The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) 1-888-426-4435 https://www.aspca.org/

Here are some tips for safely removing a bird from your home:

  1. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak and claws.
  2. Use a towel or blanket to gently cover the bird’s head.
  3. Hold the bird firmly, but gently, by its body.
  4. Carry the bird outside and release it in a safe area.

If the bird is injured, you should take it to a veterinarian or a wildlife rehabilitator immediately.

For more information on how to get a bird out of your house, visit our website How to Make Hummingbird Nectar.

We also have a number of other articles on birds, including:

VI. Conclusion

If you follow the steps outlined in this article, you should be able to safely and humanely get the bird out of your house. However, it’s important to remember that birds are wild animals and can be unpredictable. If you’re uncomfortable handling the bird yourself, or if the bird is injured, it’s best to call animal control or a wildlife rehabilitator for assistance. Taking steps to prevent birds from entering your home in the first place is also a good idea. By following these tips, you can help keep your home bird-free.

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